How Secure is Your WordPress Blog?

There are several things that can happen to a WordPress site. 1) You can get spam on your comments form or on your contact form; 2) you can get hacked; 3) you can corrupt your database.

There are many security measures that you can put in place to protect your blog.

DEFINITION – A plugin is a file (or files) installed on your blog to give the blog more function. When a plugin gets really popular, the WordPress developers sometimes build that function in so that a plugin is no longer needed. Sometimes there are so many variations on the function that it’s not feasible for it to be built in, so we need to add the function our selves.

SPAM PROTECTION – We all hate spam, don’t we? There’s no perfect way to get rid of spam altogether, but there are things we can do to minimize the amount of spam that we get.

1. Install a Captcha Plugin – You can install a captcha plugin to prove the commentor is human and not a spam-bot. Some captchas are in the form of a question that you have to answer, ie “Is fire hot or cold?”. Some are in the form of a simple addition problem, ie “1+2=”. Some just ask you to type in a random word. Captchas only prove that it is a human leaving the comment.

2. Install an Anti-Spam Plugin – Use the captcha in conjunction with an antispam. An antispam uses a rating system to decide if a comment is spam or not. If it decides a comment is spam, it puts the comments in a spam folder in your dashboard for you to moderate.

3. Moderate Your Comments – Approximately 80% of all blogs have their comments set for moderation. Moderation doesn’t stop spam, but it keeps it from being published.

4. Do Not Add Your Email Address Anywhere on Your Site. Spammers love to get a hold of email addresses. Don’t give them yours.

HACKERS – A hacker hacks into your Web server to put their code in your files. Many times the code downloads a tracker onto your visitor’s computer to steal credit card info and passwords. (You’ve heard of infected sites, right?) You won’t know you’ve been hacked until your host shuts your site down or Google sends you a notice that your site is harmful to others. Hackers target both websites and blogs, so this is not a WordPress issue, it’s a Web issue.

1. Use a Secure Password – Hackers use sophisticated computer programs to “crack” passwords. To prevent getting hacked, your best bet is to use secure passwords that are hard to guess and change them often.

2. Choose a Secure User Name – WordPress now allows you to choose your user name. Choose one that will be hard for a hacker to figure out. If your user name is “admin”, all the hacker has to figure out is the password. With a hard-to-guess user name you’ve doubled your protection. If your blog is already installed with the user name “admin”, you can change that in your database.

3. Use a Security Key – WordPress has a third built-in anti-hacker feature that few people take advantage of because it means editing your wp-config WordPress file. You can use a security key generator to generate a secure key.

4. Install a File Monitor Plugin – You can install a File Monitor plugin that will notify you immediately – before any computers are infected and before your host and Google finds out. How this plugin works is that it takes a snapshot of your files now so that when one of them changes, you get an email letting you know. This way you know long before the hacker can do any damage to your visitor’s computers and long before Google labels your site as harmful. Because it tells you exactly what files have been changed, it saves you time. You don’t have to search every file to see if there is hacked code added because you already know what files have been changed. The file monitor plugin doesn’t stop hackers, but it does alert you in enough time to do something about it before it causes huge, expensive problems.

CORRUPT DATABASE – You can lose all your pages, your posts, or your comments if your database corrupts. Things that can corrupt a database include plugins conflicting, files not installing completely, and electrical storms.

1. Back Up Your Database – You can install a plugin that creates backup copies. Set the plugin to create a new copy each time you create a new blog post. You will receive an email each time it backs up telling you where the backup is located in your files. These emails are just letting you know that the plugin is working in case anything bad ever happens. It’s like insurance. 99% of the time you will never need it, but the 1 time you do, you’ll be glad you have the backups.

2. Export Your XML File – Each time you post to your blog, go to Tools in the left-hand menu. Click on Tools>Export and export the XML file. The XML file is a copy of all your pages, posts, and comments. It doesn’t matter if you can read the file or not. Just keep a copy in case you ever need to restore your site. The XML file will name itself the date that it’s been exported so it’s easy to figure out which file is your most recent.

If you’d like to learn more about maintaining your own WordPress blog, then I’d like to invite you to claim another free article, Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about WordPress when you visit http://www.WordPressMasteryClub.com.

* * * * *

Crystal Pina is a self-taught WordPress extraordinaire. Because she believes that everyone should be able to maintain their own WordPress blogs, she created WordPressMasteryClub.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Crystal_Pina

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4871288

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How Secure is Your WordPress Blog?

There are several things that can happen to a WordPress site. 1) You can get spam on your comments form or on your contact form; 2) you can get hacked; 3) you can corrupt your database.

There are many security measures that you can put in place to protect your blog.

DEFINITION – A plugin is a file (or files) installed on your blog to give the blog more function. When a plugin gets really popular, the WordPress developers sometimes build that function in so that a plugin is no longer needed. Sometimes there are so many variations on the function that it’s not feasible for it to be built in, so we need to add the function our selves.

SPAM PROTECTION – We all hate spam, don’t we? There’s no perfect way to get rid of spam altogether, but there are things we can do to minimize the amount of spam that we get.

1. Install a Captcha Plugin – You can install a captcha plugin to prove the commentor is human and not a spam-bot. Some captchas are in the form of a question that you have to answer, ie “Is fire hot or cold?”. Some are in the form of a simple addition problem, ie “1+2=”. Some just ask you to type in a random word. Captchas only prove that it is a human leaving the comment.

2. Install an Anti-Spam Plugin – Use the captcha in conjunction with an antispam. An antispam uses a rating system to decide if a comment is spam or not. If it decides a comment is spam, it puts the comments in a spam folder in your dashboard for you to moderate.

3. Moderate Your Comments – Approximately 80% of all blogs have their comments set for moderation. Moderation doesn’t stop spam, but it keeps it from being published.

4. Do Not Add Your Email Address Anywhere on Your Site. Spammers love to get a hold of email addresses. Don’t give them yours.

HACKERS – A hacker hacks into your Web server to put their code in your files. Many times the code downloads a tracker onto your visitor’s computer to steal credit card info and passwords. (You’ve heard of infected sites, right?) You won’t know you’ve been hacked until your host shuts your site down or Google sends you a notice that your site is harmful to others. Hackers target both websites and blogs, so this is not a WordPress issue, it’s a Web issue.

1. Use a Secure Password – Hackers use sophisticated computer programs to “crack” passwords. To prevent getting hacked, your best bet is to use secure passwords that are hard to guess and change them often.

2. Choose a Secure User Name – WordPress now allows you to choose your user name. Choose one that will be hard for a hacker to figure out. If your user name is “admin”, all the hacker has to figure out is the password. With a hard-to-guess user name you’ve doubled your protection. If your blog is already installed with the user name “admin”, you can change that in your database.

3. Use a Security Key – WordPress has a third built-in anti-hacker feature that few people take advantage of because it means editing your wp-config WordPress file. You can use a security key generator to generate a secure key.

4. Install a File Monitor Plugin – You can install a File Monitor plugin that will notify you immediately – before any computers are infected and before your host and Google finds out. How this plugin works is that it takes a snapshot of your files now so that when one of them changes, you get an email letting you know. This way you know long before the hacker can do any damage to your visitor’s computers and long before Google labels your site as harmful. Because it tells you exactly what files have been changed, it saves you time. You don’t have to search every file to see if there is hacked code added because you already know what files have been changed. The file monitor plugin doesn’t stop hackers, but it does alert you in enough time to do something about it before it causes huge, expensive problems.

CORRUPT DATABASE – You can lose all your pages, your posts, or your comments if your database corrupts. Things that can corrupt a database include plugins conflicting, files not installing completely, and electrical storms.

1. Back Up Your Database – You can install a plugin that creates backup copies. Set the plugin to create a new copy each time you create a new blog post. You will receive an email each time it backs up telling you where the backup is located in your files. These emails are just letting you know that the plugin is working in case anything bad ever happens. It’s like insurance. 99% of the time you will never need it, but the 1 time you do, you’ll be glad you have the backups.

2. Export Your XML File – Each time you post to your blog, go to Tools in the left-hand menu. Click on Tools>Export and export the XML file. The XML file is a copy of all your pages, posts, and comments. It doesn’t matter if you can read the file or not. Just keep a copy in case you ever need to restore your site. The XML file will name itself the date that it’s been exported so it’s easy to figure out which file is your most recent.

If you’d like to learn more about maintaining your own WordPress blog, then I’d like to invite you to claim another free article, Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about WordPress when you visit http://www.WordPressMasteryClub.com.

* * * * *

Crystal Pina is a self-taught WordPress extraordinaire. Because she believes that everyone should be able to maintain their own WordPress blogs, she created WordPressMasteryClub.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Crystal_Pina

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4871288

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://allianceforvirtualbiz.com/2011/08/how-secure-is-your-wordpress-blog/trackback/